Grounded Theory is used frequently and discussed often by qualitative researchers, and can be a very useful methodology for indepth analysis of data - yet it can be quite confusing for new researchers to learn about - partly because there are different variants and methods. Here, we provide a list of useful resources to help you get your head around grounded theory.

24th June 2019 • 0 comments

Generating best evidence from qualitative research: the role of data analysis

by Julie Green, Karen Willis, Emma Hughes, Rhonda Small, Nicky Welch, Lisa Gibbs, Jeanne Daly

We explore the clear links between data analysis and evidence. We argue that transparency in the data analysis process is integral to determining the evidence that is generated. Data analysis must occur concurrently with data collection and comprises an ongoing process of ‘testing the fit’ between the data collected and analysis. We discuss four steps in the process of thematic data analysis: immersion, coding, categorisingand generation of themes.

28th May 2019 • 0 comments

This practical guide can be accessed online, and comes with Global Health Social Sciences' complete recommendation! This book provides a practical way of thinking about GT in relation to your project, taking the reader through the stages involved with developing a coding framework and generating theory from your data. 

11th March 2019 • 0 comments

Making research more people-centred

by Avinash Kumar, Mesh Editorial Team
15th February 2019 • 0 comments
15th February 2019 • 0 comments

Strategy for Public Engagement

by Mesh Editorial Team, Ian Thornton
13th February 2019 • 0 comments

Embedding Engagement in Research

by Mesh Editorial Team, Imran Khan
13th February 2019 • 0 comments

Toolkit: Communication for Behavioural Impact (COMBI)

by UNICEF, WHO & FAO, Mesh Editorial Team
14th January 2019 • 0 comments

Blog post: Wellcome: Zika: Q&A with a medical anthropologist

by Sharon Abramowitz, Mesh Editorial Team
7th January 2019 • 0 comments

We report a qualitative study embedded in a trial of second antidepressant for people who had not responded to one antidepressant, exploring the acceptability of a combination of antidepressants from the perspectives of both patients and practitioners, together with experiences of participating in a clinical trial.

17th December 2018 • 0 comments

In this commentary, I trace the evolution of this trend, illustrating how a reasonable original intent has taken a misguided turn in the context of competing understandings and priorities in health care knowledge development.

17th December 2018 • 0 comments

Protective parents and permissive children: what qualitative interviews with parents and children can tell us about the feasibility of juvenile idiopathic arthritis trials

by Frances C. Sherratt, Louise Roper, Simon R. Stones, Flora McErlane, Matthew Peak, Michael W. Beresford, Helen Foster, Athimalaipet V. Ramanan, Madeleine Rooney, Eileen Baildam, Bridget Young

Studies involving CYP are advocated in the literature but we are not aware of any early stage feasibility studies that have qualitatively accessed the perspectives of parents and CYP with a long term condition to inform design and conduct of a trial. In the context of a feasibility study to inform the design of a proposed randomised controlled trial of corticosteroid induction regimen in JIA, we explored families’ perspectives on the proposed trial and on JIA trials generally.

17th December 2018 • 1 comment

Nurses’ perceptions towards the delivery and feasibility of a behaviour change intervention to enhance activity in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease in primary care: a qualitative study

by Heleen Westland, Yvonne Koop, Carin D. Schröder, Marieke J. Schuurmans, P. Slabbers, Jaap C. A. Trappenburg, Sigrid C. J. M. Vervoort

 This study aimed to evaluate nurses’ perceptions towards the delivery and feasibility of the Activate intervention.

17th December 2018 • 0 comments

Including qualitative research in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT): opportunities for nursing researchers

by Loredana Sasso, Mark Hayter, Gianluca Catania, Giuseppe Aleo, Milko P Zanini , Annamaria Bagnasco

n this editorial we argue that qualitative research can enhance the quality, rigor and depth of an RCT –but at present this is an opportunity that is frequently missed. We further propose that not only can qualitative research enhance the design and conduct of an RCT it also provides an opportunity for qualitative researchers (often nurse researchers) and research nurses (often not actively involved in undertaking research) to work with medical colleagues to improve the quality of RCT design.

6th November 2018 • 1 comment

This page provides links to commonly used reporting guidelines for qualitative research, as well as articles which provide useful information about how to write about your research.

22nd October 2018 • 0 comments